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China Policy Institute: Analysis

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Fake Wine in China

Written by Anqi Shen.

The wine market has grown rapidly in China. Associated with middle-class consumption, imported top-end wine has increased in popularity, to the extent that China is now one of the largest wine consuming countries in the world. Where there is a high demand for branded wine, there is an incentive to produce fakes. While it is hard to gauge the scale of wine counterfeiting in China, journalistic and anecdotal sources estimate that 30% of all alcohol in China is counterfeit and 70% of wine is fake. Continue reading “Fake Wine in China”

China’s new commercial media is complicating the Party’s good news narrative about Africa

Written by Xiaoling Zhang.

Since the Chinese government started introducing economic reforms in the early 1980s the Chinese media has experienced widespread decentralisation and commercialisation. It has become huge, dynamic and at times contradictory.

Although all media outlets are under the control of the Communist Party-led state, the market economy has given rise to an unprecedented proliferation of media outlets. This has, to some extent, undermined the party media system. While some papers such as the People’s Daily still operate purely as state mouthpieces, commercial media outlets are guided by commercial imperatives as well as political duties. Continue reading “China’s new commercial media is complicating the Party’s good news narrative about Africa”

Trump Swings for the Fences on Taiwan

Written by Wayne Pajunen.

When U.S. President-elect Donald Trump respectfully referred to China’s debased “leader on Taiwan” as “President Tsai Ing-wen” in a historic phone call that still rings around the world, controversy over China–U.S. relations stepped up to the plate.

Why would Trump in the spring training of his presidency choose confrontation with Beijing in his first at-bat in the ballpark of international diplomacy? Continue reading “Trump Swings for the Fences on Taiwan”

A new law in China is threatening the work of international NGOs

Written by Andreas Fulda.

A controversial new law regulating the activities of foreign non-profit organisations (NPOs) in China came into effect on January 1. Under the Overseas NGO Law, foreign NPOs will have to meet very stringent registration and reporting guidelines, which raises concerns about China’s lack of progress towards good governance and the rule of law.

Critics have taken issue with the fact that the law brings foreign NPOs and their operations under the jurisdiction of the Chinese Ministry of Public Security. This leads to an over-politicisation of the civil society sector in China. Chinese officials seem to consider foreign NPOs and their Chinese partners as potentially undermining the authority of the Chinese Communist Party. Continue reading “A new law in China is threatening the work of international NGOs”

Eating and Drinking in Chinese Officialdom

Written by Jiangnan Zhu and Xiaoming Zhong.

In the period leading up to Xi Jinping’s ascension, banqueting had become both prevalent and lavish in Chinese political circles. These banquets instilled a culture of extravagance among officials, breeding corrupt behavior and squandering public resources. By 2012, nationwide annual public expenditure on eating and drinking by government officials had reached a total of RMB 300 billion. Continue reading “Eating and Drinking in Chinese Officialdom”

The Chinese Super League: A Footballing Vanity Project on Steroids

Written by David Prentice.

Founded in 2004, the Chinese Super League consists of 16 teams; Guizhou Zhicheng, Liaoning F.C., Jiangsu Suning, Beijing Guo’an, and Guangzhou R&F make up just five of these clubs of which little is known outside the Middle Kingdom. Whilst they are hardly well known, established footballing names, the Chinese Super League (CSL) is perhaps currently the richest footballing league in the world. A recent explosion of spending power reaching mind-numbing proportions is putting the CSL firmly on the map, and big name players more than ever are starting to turn their attention to Chinese cash. Continue reading “The Chinese Super League: A Footballing Vanity Project on Steroids”

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