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China Policy Institute: Analysis

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Politics

Fiscal Starvation: The Unintended Consequences of Xi Jinping’s Anti-Corruption Campaign

Written by Hiroki Takeuchi.

President Xi Jinping’s fierce anti-corruption campaign has been one of his signature reform policies since his inauguration as General Secretary of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) in 2012. The campaign seemed to be the right policy to secure the future of the Party. Official corruption has been rampant in China and has become one of the major sources of public dissatisfaction. The CCP leadership has feared that corruption, if left unaddressed, could undermine the stability of one-party rule. Perhaps ironically, however, the success of Xi’s campaign has itself undermined the basis of one-party rule. Continue reading “Fiscal Starvation: The Unintended Consequences of Xi Jinping’s Anti-Corruption Campaign”

Eating and Drinking in Chinese Officialdom

Written by Jiangnan Zhu and Xiaoming Zhong.

In the period leading up to Xi Jinping’s ascension, banqueting had become both prevalent and lavish in Chinese political circles. These banquets instilled a culture of extravagance among officials, breeding corrupt behavior and squandering public resources. By 2012, nationwide annual public expenditure on eating and drinking by government officials had reached a total of RMB 300 billion. Continue reading “Eating and Drinking in Chinese Officialdom”

Trump’s Unlikely Ally: The Chinese Dissident

Written by Edward White.

This March, Donald J. Trump, then standing to become the Republican presidential nominee, drew the ire of three prominent Chinese dissidents after referring to the 1989 Tiananmen Square Massacre as a “riot,” and praising the “strength” shown by the Chinese government in suppressing the protests.

“Trump’s callous dismissal of the tragedy, and his apparent esteem for Beijing’s butchers, left us speechless, in pain and in tears,” wrote Yang Jianli (楊建利), Fang Zheng (方政) and Zhou Fengsuo (周鋒鎖) in a Washington Post op-ed. Continue reading “Trump’s Unlikely Ally: The Chinese Dissident”

What now for the Rebalance?

Written by Ali Wyne.

As U.S. President Barack Obama approaches the end of his time in office, a convergence of developments is challenging his principal foreign-policy initiative, the effort to rebalance America’s strategic equities towards the Asia-Pacific. Continue reading “What now for the Rebalance?”

The Chinese Left: Contexts and Strategies

Written by Christopher Connery.

Let’s define the “left” broadly as standing against market fundamentalism, against the dominance of finance capital, and as advocating economic and social equality, worker and peasant power, and social welfare.[1] Most leftists worldwide share these values. A distinguishing feature of the Chinese new left, however, is that it is not, strictly speaking, an oppositional force. In most of the rest of the world, governments identified with the left or far left (Greece, Bolivia, Uruguay et al) face significant opposition from the further left. Continue reading “The Chinese Left: Contexts and Strategies”

Xi Jinping: Where Does the Power Come From?

Written by Kerry Brown.

The consensus on the history of the People’s Republic of China after its establishment in 1949 is that the last seven decades divides into two phases. The first until 1978, broadly covering the Maoist era, saw mass campaigns, Utopian visions guiding social development, and an ideology based on class struggle. After 1978, in the reform and opening up era, the focus shifted dramatically to making economic development and material improvements through marketization, privatization, and opening to the outside world. Continue reading “Xi Jinping: Where Does the Power Come From?”

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