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China Policy Institute: Analysis

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Tsai Ing-wen

Taiwan’s Truth and Reconciliation Committee: The Geopolitics of Transitional Justice in a Contested State.

Written by Ian Rowen and Jamie Rowen.

On 20 May 2016, Tsai Ing-wen, the chair of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), was inaugurated as the president of the Republic of China (ROC) on Taiwan. During her inauguration speech, she announced that she planned to set up a truth and reconciliation commission (TRC) inside the presidential office. ‘For the new democratic system to move forward,’ she said, ‘we must first find a way to face the past together.’ She continued by remarking that, ‘The goal of transitional justice (TJ) is to pursue true social reconciliation, so that all Taiwanese can take to heart the mistakes of that era.’ Continue reading “Taiwan’s Truth and Reconciliation Committee: The Geopolitics of Transitional Justice in a Contested State.”

Xi Jinping and China’s “Two Sessions”

Written by Lynette Ong.

China’s “Two Sessions”, its annual political gatherings, have just drawn to a close. The “Two Sessions” (lianghui) are the meetings of the National People’s Congress (NPC), and the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC) that take place in March every year. The NPC is the country’s largely rubber-stamp parliament that has around 3,000 delegates. Because of its unwieldy size and the fact that it largely approves all legislations that are put before it, it works more like party conventions in the United States. Continue reading “Xi Jinping and China’s “Two Sessions””

U.S. Government Commission Strategic Policy Analysis

Written by Bert Chapman.

Bilateral relations between China and the U.S. encompass multiple issues including human rights, space power, trade relations, currency manipulation, cyber power, China’s increasing military assertiveness in the East and South China Seas, Beijing’s desire to implement this assertiveness through international legal forums and its economic assistance to other countries, and its desire to get other countries to submit to its desire to restrict international support for Taiwan. Continue reading “U.S. Government Commission Strategic Policy Analysis”

Translation in Activism and Cyber-nationalism in China.

Written by Guobin Yang.

On January 20, 2016, young nationalists in the PRC, now nicknamed Little Pink, launched an “expedition” from the popular Baidu message board “Diba” to the Facebook page of Taiwan’s newly elected president Tsai Ing-wen. They posted large numbers of emojis, called “emoji packs” (biaoqing bao), on Tsai’s Facebook page, attacking her pro-Taiwanese independence position while expressing pride for the natural beauties, cuisine, and history of mainland China. The online organizers of this “expedition” set up a translation team to render some of their slogans in English. A popular song called “Missing home” (xiang chou), with lyrics like “My wandering son, do you still remember the sweetness of our land,” was circulated in multiple languages.  Continue reading “Translation in Activism and Cyber-nationalism in China.”

Taiwan and Free Trade Agreements – Missing the Wood for the Trees?

Written by Michael Reilly.

Apart from city-state entrepôts such as Hong Kong and Singapore, Taiwan is probably the most trade-dependent nation in the world. The WTO calculates its current trade/gdp ratio as 130.5, higher than Korea’s at 104.2, much more so the EU’s of 33.9. So it is no surprise that successive governments have placed a high priority on negotiating or acceding to Free Trade Agreements. The flagship policy achievement of the previous KMT administration was the Economic Co-operation Framework Agreement (ECFA) it signed with China in 2010, which was followed by bilateral free trade agreements with Singapore and New Zealand.

Continue reading “Taiwan and Free Trade Agreements – Missing the Wood for the Trees?”

Tsai Gets Passing Grade for Apology to Taiwan’s Aborigines

Written by J.Michael Cole.

It was a move that many saw as unnecessary — and an unnecessarily risky. In a highly publicized event at the Presidential Office in Taipei earlier today, Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) formally apologized to the nation’s Aborigines for the unfair treatment they received over the past 400 years.

In the weeks leading to today’s event, a number of activists and members of Aboriginal communities across Taiwan had wondered why President Tsai felt compelled to apologize to the land’s first inhabitants. For many of them, the ceremony would be simply that — a grandiose, well publicized exercise in public relations which, in the end, would not yield the morsel that’s always been missing: substance. Continue reading “Tsai Gets Passing Grade for Apology to Taiwan’s Aborigines”

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